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Callsign_Gloves

Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)

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Hey Agents,

Thought I would talk a bit about a program here in the United States today, and hopefully, get some opinions on what you all think about it. Especially veterans. From my experiences, the older vets (WWII, Korea, Vietnam) all really like us, but so far, vets from onwards, such as the Global War On Terror (GOWT) are not as big of fans. Anyways, let's start.

JROTC, or, the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, is a federally sponsored program by the U.S. Armed Forces. Each branch of the military  maintains a corps. And yes, even the Coast Guard. But I believe the few that exist (as far as I know, they only have 2 or 3 units) are in Alaska. I may be wrong. Moving along. It's offered as a high school (secondary school) elective, typically lasting only a single period, and lead by retired veterans. One an Officer, the second an Enlisted. At least in AFJROTC, we call the Officer that SASI (Senior Aerospace Science Instructor) and the Enlisted the ASI (Aerospace Science Instructor).

I myself have been a cadet for the past nearly 4 months now. C/AMN Scott, Flight F, Squadron OH-20052, Region 2, AFJROTC. Each branch puts their initials in front of JROTC. AF being Air Force (Yay Chair Force!), A being Army, MC - Marine Corps, N - Navy, you get it. Also, regarding ranks, and addressing cadets. The C/ of C/AMN stands for Cadet. AMN = Airman, an actual USAF rank abbreviation. We do not hold that rank, we hold the cadet equivalent to it. Cadets are typically addressed as "Cadet", but by other cadets, it varies. Some units address each other by rank, but the majority just seem to do last names. I personally tend to address the cadet officers by rank.

A question I get asked (and I assume many other cadets get asked) a lot is "Are you going into/are in the military?". Although we are in a program funded by it, no, we are not. We have no contract, service obligation, or anything. We are simply cadets. Now, if you do (some say serve, but again, some veterans do not like us saying that) 2 or more years in it, and decide to enlist in a branch, then you will get some benefits. I understand the wiki page says 3-4 years, but that is incorrect.

I have heard, however, that each branch may handle it differently. This is what I know though. 2 years will get you E-2, and 3-4 years can get you E-3. I have heard that it is slightly different for the Marine Corps, and that it takes 3-4 years to get E-2 with them. A friend of mine did 2, and he has enlisted in the Corps. So I will check with him on that. 

Another question is if we get military training, and what do we learn from it. Military training, yes, and no. Is it like Basic Training? Absolutely not. But it will help you do better there, and obviously, once you graduate from it, you may get advanced rank. But this is not a mile run for PT every day, or even every week. It is not firearms, or tactics. It's not hell week, it's not anything near that. It is typically the more formal part of the Armed Forces. I'm talking marching, rank structure, uniform wear, courtesies, and for myself, also astronomy, and leadership and communication. There are teams, and guards you may join however. Armed, and unarmed exhibition, Honor and/or Color Guard, Raider Teams, and I have no idea how many units, if any at all, have air rifle teams anymore. I know the majority do not.

I'm trying hard not to drag this out too long, so if you have questions, I will reply, but I'm trying to give a brief overall of it.

To end things, I'll say what it's personally allowed me to do, and what I think of it.

I haven't been in long, but some highlights have been being selected for my squadrons Raiders Team (Which is a physical fitness team), doing Color Guards, community service, parades, ceremonies, and using AN-PVS-7 Night Vision Goggles (I call them NVG's, or Nods, for short).

My personal opinion of it, is that it's full of great experiences. Your under the supervision of veterans who have served 20+ years, and trust me, they have a great amount of knowledge and wisdom. Once you've been there for awhile, you can really start to look up to them, and be mentored even. That, in my mind, is invaluable. If you're looking to enlist, defiantly a good choice. Get a little ahead of other people, and go in with some knowledge that others won't have yet. If you don't plan to serve, you can still get some great experiences from it. You can even get scholarships. Which, nobody will really turn down.

Any questions, opinions, or comments, are welcome!

(EDIT: I served 7 months with Flight F, Squadron OH-20052, Region 2, AFJROTC. Finishing as a Cadet Senior Airman, with the following decorations: Superior Performance Ribbon, Academic Ribbon (1st OLC), Special Teams Ribbon (Commonly know as the Drill Competition Ribbon), Service Ribbon, Activities Ribbon, Attendance Ribbon (1st OLC), Good Conduct Ribbon, and Dress and Appearance Ribbon. Holding the position of Flight Sergeant, and recognition of Outstanding Cadet of the Quarter (Top 7 of the Squadron).)

 

 

 

 

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To answer @Oh. daesu from this thread: http://www.thedivisionforums.com/topic/4832-what-gpu-for-at-least-50fps/?tab=comments#comment-28448

 

I currently have not taken any medical courses since Spring. I was working to become a certified EMR (Emergency Medical Responder), but the state of Ohio prohibits me from becoming so till I am 17 years of age, and/or am in my last year of secondary school. So I have to wait till next year. I responded to one medical incident back in October, and have dealt with suicidal and depressed individuals in the past, however.

If you haven't read by posts in the past, I'm looking to commission as a Combat Rescue Officer in the United States Air Force. It's Tier 2 Special Operations that aeromedically evacuates wounded soldiers and civilians. It's one of a couple reasons I am interested in emergency and trauma medicine.

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Tacking on another highlight here. Army National Guard came in this morning and went over some Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) stuff. I knew it for the most part, just having studied this stuff for a while, but defiantly a good refresher for me. Even better for those who had no idea how to perform in any medical capacity. It also reminded me of all the gear I still should be buying... Like tourniquets.

Now on break for the next 2 weeks. So thinking about trying to grow a bit of what I call an "Angry Beard". I have resting bitch face. So, I think if you put a beard on me, it would be an angry beard.

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Oh. daesu    1,195

In Australia, we don't really have that type of thing. We have cadets which is really purely at a high school level. 

At one point, I considered joining the Army Reserves in a medic unit. I remember in the group there was some cadets, who mentioned they had been in the cadets. The sergeant just said "that's nice".

Sounds cool you can prep your self with qualifications. Make the effort, show interest in it. Not just exam scores.

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On 12/19/2017 at 6:51 AM, Oh. daesu said:

In Australia, we don't really have that type of thing. We have cadets which is really purely at a high school level. 

At one point, I considered joining the Army Reserves in a medic unit. I remember in the group there was some cadets, who mentioned they had been in the cadets. The sergeant just said "that's nice".

Sounds cool you can prep your self with qualifications. Make the effort, show interest in it. Not just exam scores.

How much promotion does the military there get? During High School, there is advertisements and promotions everywhere. And if you score well on the ASVAB, you may be having recruiters running after you. We have so many different cadets, I don't think I could name them all (JROTC, ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, Army Cadets, Naval Sea Cadet Corps, just to name some.).

Exactly. If you just do stuff to pass, 1. You probably will end up forgetting it. 2. You may do even worse on an exam without your heart being in it. I had no idea you looked into medical units. Everybody gets taught the basics at basic training, and in combat, your carrier always has an IFAK on it, but the specialized guys are the ones I really want working on me!

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Oh. daesu    1,195
On 21/12/2017 at 7:14 AM, HawKShoT said:

How much promotion does the military there get? During High School, there is advertisements and promotions everywhere. And if you score well on the ASVAB, you may be having recruiters running after you. We have so many different cadets, I don't think I could name them all (JROTC, ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, Army Cadets, Naval Sea Cadet Corps, just to name some.).

Exactly. If you just do stuff to pass, 1. You probably will end up forgetting it. 2. You may do even worse on an exam without your heart being in it. I had no idea you looked into medical units. Everybody gets taught the basics at basic training, and in combat, your carrier always has an IFAK on it, but the specialized guys are the ones I really want working on me!

It's not heavily promoted. And if you're interested in a trade or speciality, it can be quite competitive to get into. Tho, we aren't a big country.

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1 hour ago, Oh. daesu said:

It's not heavily promoted. And if you're interested in a trade or speciality, it can be quite competitive to get into. Tho, we aren't a big country.

True. I think the U.S. is also rated one of the most, if not, the most patriotic country in the world also? That can have an effect.

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Man, I have not been here for awhile. And with a good excuse. I've moved to the very sunny town of Tempe, Arizona. Hooray for no more snow, sleet, ice, salt, and cold temperatures!

I did have to leave my squadron. So I turned my uniforms and everything back in, as they are government property. I was able to keep my rank, ribbons, dress shoes and socks, PTs, and a uniform V neck however.

Before I left, I practiced for a couple weeks with the squadrons Honor Guard. Super cool guys (and gals). Amazing how good they can get spinning, flipping, and throwing rifles. 8.5 pound M1903 rifles. Drill rifles, so deactivated. I picked up some stuff from them, and it defiantly can become fun doing. Didn't really enjoy the regulation drill stuff, but exhibition was defiantly enjoyable.

Attended a Military Ball as well, not something I typically would enjoy. But I grew comfortable with a lot of cadets at that point.

Turning in my uniform was a very sad moment for me. I was very proud of the uniform The transferring process doesn't seem too terrible so far. I had my cadet record printed out from my squadron, and I'm just taking it to my new unit.  I'm transferring to the Padre Battalion, 5th Brigade, AJROTC. I understand Regiment comes after battalion, but we don't really have regiments so to speak. Unless you count the states as so. Everything is divided by Region, or Brigade, containing multiple states. I'm currently talking to the Major and Sergeant First Class' there on how my rank, decorations, etc will transfer over to them. I have heard that when transferring branches, they may knock you down a grade though. If everything transfers perfectly, I would be a Cadet Corporal. But I'm not holding my breath.

The end of my last day, I was awarded 2 additional ribbons, and apparently I was the first cadet in 12 years to have attended every one of the squadrons events. Some kind words from the Chief and Colonel as well.

Thinking about making a shadow box for my old stuff. I've seen former cadets do them, and they come out very nice. Just going to buy copies of some stuff like my name tags, tape, and patch.

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Oh. daesu    1,195

So, you have to hand in your uniform then to be provided with a new set once you report in? 

Are they separate enough not to cover that? I guess also with cadets there's less  guarantee you will eventually show up. Being cadets, less obligation and young.

What prompts the move to Tempe?

What's your move distance? I'm about to move from Sydney to Melbourne. 870km (a.k.a 540  miles). Though we're using a moving company . Younger days done myself in a hire truck. Fun fun..

I'm actually a cold weather person anyhoo. Though the climate diff is not as great as it is for you. Melb not that much colder and no snow. Bigger difference for you.

Is your new cadet posting the same or a different role and training?

 

 

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On 3/9/2018 at 5:14 AM, Oh. daesu said:

So, you have to hand in your uniform then to be provided with a new set once you report in? 

Are they separate enough not to cover that? I guess also with cadets there's less  guarantee you will eventually show up. Being cadets, less obligation and young.

What prompts the move to Tempe?

What's your move distance? I'm about to move from Sydney to Melbourne. 870km (a.k.a 540  miles). Though we're using a moving company . Younger days done myself in a hire truck. Fun fun..

I'm actually a cold weather person anyhoo. Though the climate diff is not as great as it is for you. Melb not that much colder and no snow. Bigger difference for you.

Is your new cadet posting the same or a different role and training?

 

 

Correct. Even if you switch to another squadron/battalion in the same branch, you have to turn it in. For me, switching branches and going to an army battalion defiantly warrants it. They have you turn them in so they can recycle them to other cadets. I had roughly 650$ in uniforms. If you damage them, you pay for them. 

Oh absolutely less obligation. I knew one guy who stayed a couple weeks then quit. JROTC has no service obligation. ROTC on the other hand, has no obligation your first 2 years. Your last 2 you do.

Dad got a job with the State of Arizona's State Park Service. He's an I.T., But he also goes out to the parks if something needs done at one. And, let me tell you, Arizona and New Mexico have some of the most beautiful scenery I have ever seen.

Oh the difference between here and Ohio is very different. While they were at 19F (-5C) and in a snow storm, it was 80F (25C) and clear here. Nights here can become a bit chilly though. As deserts tend to do.

There is going to be some differences between the old and new units. My old one was an air force squadron, my new one is an army battalion. So uniforms, rank structure wise, different. Regulations tend to similar between air force and army as far as I have seen. Same drill regulations, same salutes, etc. As for curriculum, I have no idea what they'll be putting me in yet. It's taking some time getting in. I have the papers I need, but they don't seem to know what to do with me. Most cadets go to the school they're based at full time. Where as I will not be.

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Oh. daesu    1,195
18 hours ago, Callsign_Gloves said:

Correct. Even if you switch to another squadron/battalion in the same branch, you have to turn it in. For me, switching branches and going to an army battalion defiantly warrants it. They have you turn them in so they can recycle them to other cadets. I had roughly 650$ in uniforms. If you damage them, you pay for them. 

Oh absolutely less obligation. I knew one guy who stayed a couple weeks then quit. JROTC has no service obligation. ROTC on the other hand, has no obligation your first 2 years. Your last 2 you do.

Dad got a job with the State of Arizona's State Park Service. He's an I.T., But he also goes out to the parks if something needs done at one. And, let me tell you, Arizona and New Mexico have some of the most beautiful scenery I have ever seen.

Oh the difference between here and Ohio is very different. While they were at 19F (-5C) and in a snow storm, it was 80F (25C) and clear here. Nights here can become a bit chilly though. As deserts tend to do.

There is going to be some differences between the old and new units. My old one was an air force squadron, my new one is an army battalion. So uniforms, rank structure wise, different. Regulations tend to similar between air force and army as far as I have seen. Same drill regulations, same salutes, etc. As for curriculum, I have no idea what they'll be putting me in yet. It's taking some time getting in. I have the papers I need, but they don't seem to know what to do with me. Most cadets go to the school they're based at full time. Where as I will not be.

Ah, a different armed service. Yeah different uniform, lol. It sounds like a good change. Hopefully their training and courses they have suit your direction. Let us know how it goes.

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Got in the battalion Tuesday. Got my tour from the Major, and man, the place is a literal bunker! Steel door, stairs down to what they call the "basement" of the school, smaller than what I'm used to, but defiantly cooler.

Got assigned my unit for now, only 9 weeks left at this point. It's my first year as a cadet, but again, I'm placed with upperclassmen. They plan to move me into the 4th years next year.

Very many things are different. More than I originally thought. Couple additional things in marching, but they don't do much of it. Sequence is MUCH shorter and simpler than what I did. They do, however, place more emphasis on addressing people properly. Cadet Lieutenants are simply called Lieutenant, Same with Sergeants, and vice versa. And more responsibilities for those roles.

Promotions are done by passing a promotions test. You have to score 100% to pass. It's all very basic stuff however. But they still only have 10% pass it. Which tells me a lot about the dedication of the battalions cadets. It clearly reflects from my company. Alpha company is typically awarded as the best company, but their performance is not impressive to me. Nobody seems to keep bearing, their are even worse at marching than my old flight. I thought my flight was bad, and they did a longer and more complicated sequence. But they look good compared to this company. Everybody loves to talk, chewing gum, won't listen to the platoon sergeant, just all around terrible. The platoon and first sergeant, along with the sergeant first class and Lieutenant have their acts together thankfully. The first sergeant is by far the best there. Does everything just perfectly.

I have transferred over as a Corporal, despite having some things to learn. It seems all are very impressed with me so far. Hopefully we can keep things that way. I hear we'll be target shooting and rappelling soon as well.

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Oh. daesu    1,195

Yeah, don't let others low standards cause you to lower your own, lol. Nothing usual about that that.

Reading a bit about Baltimero Lopez. He was in an iconic picture of a marine clamoring over the front of a beach lander during Incheon. He was JROTC.

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3 hours ago, Oh. daesu said:

Yeah, don't let others low standards cause you to lower your own, lol. Nothing usual about that that.

Reading a bit about Baltimero Lopez. He was in an iconic picture of a marine clamoring over the front of a beach lander during Incheon. He was JROTC.

He's a good example of cadets who eventually enlist or commission. I'll try not to get too political here, but during the Parkland shooting in Florida, a group called "Code Pink" came up, and apparently they're looking to remove JROTC for "militarizing" students, despite the courage of other cadets. Cadet Private Peter Wang held doors open to get people out. He was killed, posthumously awarded the Medal of Heroism, and was given full military honors at his funeral. Along with 2 other cadets, Alaina Petty and Martin Duque. Another cadet, Cadet Second Lieutenant Colton Haab, protected up to 70 students with kevlar backdrop.

 

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genedjr    288
Posted (edited)

I would respond to this, but this is a gaming forum.  All I can say is, well done, well done indeed.

...gene

Edited by genedjr
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genedjr    288
On 3/25/2018 at 5:28 AM, Oh. daesu said:

Yeah, don't let others low standards cause you to lower your own, lol. Nothing usual about that that.

Reading a bit about Baltimero Lopez. He was in an iconic picture of a marine clamoring over the front of a beach lander during Incheon. He was JROTC.

My dad give my invaluable advise when I got my first job (landscaping).  "Work at your speed, don't worry that other can't keep up."  I have live by that for a long time...

...gene

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15 hours ago, genedjr said:

My dad give my invaluable advise when I got my first job (landscaping).  "Work at your speed, don't worry that other can't keep up."  I have live by that for a long time...

...gene

That is some very good advise.

Had a battalion formation at 0700 this morning (of course, you arrive earlier than that), and I was the only one from my company to show up. Mama mia. "Best company" my ass! The only company that didn't show up. And apparently, last week, 3 privates on the company were carrying live .44 rounds on their persons... How stupid do you have to be to bring live ammunition onto a campus? 2 of those privates got suspended, but reported in again this morning, and I am nowhere near happy with them. I believe one was expelled, but that may be incorrect. All I can say is if they want to be the best, they better start acting like it. And fast...

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genedjr    288
On 3/28/2018 at 0:10 PM, Callsign_Gloves said:

And apparently, last week, 3 privates on the company were carrying live .44 rounds on their persons... How stupid do you have to be to bring live ammunition onto a campus? 2 of those privates got suspended, but reported in again this morning, and I am nowhere near happy with them. I believe one was expelled, but that may be incorrect. All I can say is if they want to be the best, they better start acting like it. And fast...

OK, I responded three times and deleted three times - but I will expose myself.

I don't believe .44 (I assume pistol rounds) are military issue.  Just bullets or loaded weapons?  Just bullets are practically useless.  Even if you crush them and they happen to explode (not likely) the damage radius is very small (5m at most), they are not lethal from crushing.

IMNSHO gun free zones present the terrorist  the ultimate soft target, and they should be abandoned.  Not that everyone should carry - but that no one should now who is and who isn't.

/damn - to much politics/

...gene

 

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11 hours ago, genedjr said:

OK, I responded three times and deleted three times - but I will expose myself.

I don't believe .44 (I assume pistol rounds) are military issue.  Just bullets or loaded weapons?  Just bullets are practically useless.  Even if you crush them and they happen to explode (not likely) the damage radius is very small (5m at most), they are not lethal from crushing.

IMNSHO gun free zones present the terrorist  the ultimate soft target, and they should be abandoned.  Not that everyone should carry - but that no one should now who is and who isn't.

/damn - to much politics/

...gene

 

Oh I absolutely agree with that. Arizona is a very gun friendly state, and I love that. No, .44 is not issued in the U.S.. All we got is a couple air rifles in .177/4.5mm. Although, I do believe we have a couple functioning M1903s, but those are ceremonial rifles. So I assume they rarely even put blanks in those. Now if people were conceal carrying on campus, I would be 100% for it. But you NEVER, EVER, announce or brandish a firearm, or ammunition. So even if these students were armed (I honestly question the mental state of some), they would be very irresponsible. I forgot to mention they were BRANDISHING the ammunition to other students. It's not as if they and their bags were searched and they came across them. Of course, that all was done after they were found brandishing it, and more was found.

I had a cadet look down the barrel of one of those 1903s last week, and I immediately told him off. I don't think these city kids have even handled a firearm in their lives honestly. No muzzle or trigger discipline, and looking down the barrel? Come one now.

I used to conceal a knife with me in Ohio. Typical campus policies, no knives, etc... My automotive tech garage still did it anyways. We all thought it was stupid. Tell us none of us can carry anything, but to fight an armed assailant? Okay, sure.

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